Warm Heads/Warm Hearts

A few weeks ago, three senior girls accompanied Mrs. Audrey Siegel to the Children's Inn at NIH to throw a Chanukah party. The Inn is a place where child cancer patients can stay with their families while undergoing chemotherapy and other cancer treatments.  They took over 100 hand-made hats, scarves and beaded jewelry pieces to the party, some of which were given out directly to the children, while the rest will be given out later to others.  This is the second year the Yeshiva Girls Knit and Crochet Club has been able to donate to the Children's Inn and to help out with the Chanukah Party.  The look on the children's faces as they tried on the hats and scarves, staging their own little fashion show, warmed everyone's heart.


The Yeshiva Girls Knit and Crochet Club lives up to the nickname the girls have given it:  Warm Heads/Warm Hearts. They are literally keeping some needy people warm with their needlework, but they are warming the hearts of many more.  So far this year under the direction of Mrs. Pamela Wolfe, the 30+ girls in the club have made nearly 250 knit hats and scarves for 30+ chemo patients, premature babies and others in need. Last year they made over 500 items. Earlier this year, the club took several bags of hats and scarves to Washington Adventist Hospital. Items were donated to WAH last year as well, and some of the older girls got to go to the hospital to make the donation.  The club also donated preemie hats to the NICU at Holy Cross Hospital and scarves to the National Children's Center.


Keeping all of this running and organized is an on-going task. Warm Heads/Warm Hearts meets once a week on Tuesdays at lunch in the back of Mrs. Wolfe's classroom, which looks more like a yarn shop than a school room, with boxes of yarn on the shelves, organized by color and fiber-type.  A file drawer holds all the needles, scissors and other supplies.  "Our first year, which was three years ago, I spent a lot of time teaching girls how to knit and crochet, Mrs. Wolfe said.  "Since then, I still spend some time teaching new girls how to knit, but I have older girls who can help the younger ones."  Often students come in, not to get help, but to show off finished projects to one another.  There is a great feeling of accomplishment when they place that hat or scarf in the pile with all the others.


The club can always use more yarn, needles and crochet hooks, according to Mrs. Wolfe. Many people in the community have donated materials to the group, and they have even gotten donations from far-flung places, when people learned of the group's work through the internet.  Last year the group got "yarnstormed"-- an anonymous group from New York sent them two large boxes of supplies.  Coates and Clark Company has sent materials for the past two years as well.  "We go through so much yarn.  We can always use more," Mrs. Wolfe says.  "We have so many girls knitting and crocheting now. It warms my heart to see them all, lounging in the hallways during break with their needlework. It is a calming influence during the stressful school day."  And they call out to her, full of pride,  "Look at what I made!  Can I put it in the donation pile?"  Warm hearts, indeed.

Warm Heads/Warm Hearts

A few weeks ago, three senior girls accompanied Mrs. Audrey Siegel to the Children's Inn at NIH to throw a Chanukah party. The Inn is a place where child cancer patients can stay with their families while undergoing chemotherapy and other cancer treatments.  They took over 100 hand-made hats, scarves and beaded jewelry pieces to the party, some of which were given out directly to the children, while the rest will be given out later to others.  This is the second year the Yeshiva Girls Knit and Crochet Club has been able to donate to the Children's Inn and to help out with the Chanukah Party.  The look on the children's faces as they tried on the hats and scarves, staging their own little fashion show, warmed everyone's heart.


The Yeshiva Girls Knit and Crochet Club lives up to the nickname the girls have given it:  Warm Heads/Warm Hearts. They are literally keeping some needy people warm with their needlework, but they are warming the hearts of many more.  So far this year under the direction of Mrs. Pamela Wolfe, the 30+ girls in the club have made nearly 250 knit hats and scarves for 30+ chemo patients, premature babies and others in need. Last year they made over 500 items. Earlier this year, the club took several bags of hats and scarves to Washington Adventist Hospital. Items were donated to WAH last year as well, and some of the older girls got to go to the hospital to make the donation.  The club also donated preemie hats to the NICU at Holy Cross Hospital and scarves to the National Children's Center.


Keeping all of this running and organized is an on-going task. Warm Heads/Warm Hearts meets once a week on Tuesdays at lunch in the back of Mrs. Wolfe's classroom, which looks more like a yarn shop than a school room, with boxes of yarn on the shelves, organized by color and fiber-type.  A file drawer holds all the needles, scissors and other supplies.  "Our first year, which was three years ago, I spent a lot of time teaching girls how to knit and crochet, Mrs. Wolfe said.  "Since then, I still spend some time teaching new girls how to knit, but I have older girls who can help the younger ones."  Often students come in, not to get help, but to show off finished projects to one another.  There is a great feeling of accomplishment when they place that hat or scarf in the pile with all the others.


The club can always use more yarn, needles and crochet hooks, according to Mrs. Wolfe. Many people in the community have donated materials to the group, and they have even gotten donations from far-flung places, when people learned of the group's work through the internet.  Last year the group got "yarnstormed"-- an anonymous group from New York sent them two large boxes of supplies.  Coates and Clark Company has sent materials for the past two years as well.  "We go through so much yarn.  We can always use more," Mrs. Wolfe says.  "We have so many girls knitting and crocheting now. It warms my heart to see them all, lounging in the hallways during break with their needlework. It is a calming influence during the stressful school day."  And they call out to her, full of pride,  "Look at what I made!  Can I put it in the donation pile?"  Warm hearts, indeed.